Forthcoming Edited Collection on Philosophy of Disability

In a post at the end of 2020, I mentioned that early in 2021 I would send out invitations to a pathbreaking edited collection on philosophy of disability. The invitations have been sent out and confirmed; and I have assigned a title to the book. So, here are a few details that I can share […]

Dialogues on Disability: Shelley Tremain With Alex Bryant

Hello, I’m Shelley Tremain and I’d like to welcome you to the sixth-anniversary installment of Dialogues on Disability, the series of interviews that I’m conducting with disabled philosophers and post to BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY on the third Wednesday of each month. The series is designed to provide a public venue for discussion with disabled philosophers about a […]

Dialogues on Disability: Shelley Tremain Interviews Jennifer Scuro

Hello, I’m Shelley Tremain and I’d like to welcome you to the seventy-second installment of Dialogues on Disability, the series of interviews that I am conducting with disabled philosophers and post to BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY on the third Wednesday of each month. The series is designed to provide a public venue for discussion with disabled philosophers […]

(How) Is Disability Relevant to the Field of Social Ontology?

The conception of disability that currently prevails in philosophy construes it as a philosophically uninteresting and value-neutral biological trait, that is, as a self-evidently natural and deleterious characteristic, difference, or property that some people embody or possess. Insofar as philosophers hold this naturalized and individualized conception of disability, they assume that disability is a prediscursive […]

IWD, Philosophy of Disability, and Vulnerability

Almost a year ago, I wrote the post below. The post has been viewed thousands of times and effectively launched discussion about COVID-19 and nursing homes on social media and in the popular press in Canada. As increasingly happens when one puts ideas and writing into circulation (especially with the proliferation of new social media […]

Dialogues on Disability on Wednesday, March 17th, at 8 a.m. EST

“I have read almost all of your interviews and they are always wonderful. …  I am really looking forward to the next installment of Dialogues on Disability.” — Adrian Piper “The Dialogues on Disability platform … has been very helpful to me, especially at times where I did not feel I belong in the world of […]

The Reputation of Canadian Philosophy is in the Balance

On social media platforms all across Canada and the United States, academics, activists, lawyers, physicians, and students, have come alive to the eugenic impetus of MAiD and its latest incarnation, Bill C-7, as well as to the philosophical underpinnings of these policies. Indeed, as I have noted in previous posts on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, eugenics is […]

Jama and Downie on MAiD

In previous posts, I have drawn attention to the creative and important work of Sarah Jama and the Disability Justice Network of Ontario (DJNO). For instance, I alerted readers/listeners of BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY to the recent “Death By Coercion” webinar that DJNO organized to push back against the way that the perspectives and experiences of Black, […]

Letter in Opposition to Bill C-7 from Robert Wilson and Matthew Barker

In my previous post, I strongly urged members of the philosophical community in Canada and elsewhere to write letters to the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs of the Canadian Government in opposition to the passage of Bill C-7, proposed legislation that would remove the “reasonably foreseeable” clause of the current MAiD legislation […]

Philosophers and Letters of Opposition to Bill C-7

During the past year, I’ve written various posts about MAiD and Bill C-7 (for example, here), including a post about a letter that I wrote and sent to the Senate Standing Committee on Constitutional and Legal Affairs in opposition to Bill C-7, proposed legislation that is currently under consideration in the Canadian Senate, having previously […]