Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 4

In this fourth post of Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future—a series of posts designed to explain claims that I made in response to commentators in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability—I want to elaborate my claim that naturalization of disability in philosophy has expanded in new directions. My central […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 3

This series is intended to flesh out some of the remarks that I made in a pivotal paragraph of my reply to commentators in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability. In the previous post in this series, I returned to the paragraph in order to consider the remark according to […]

Some Things to Consider About Disability and Diversity in Philosophy

As readers and listeners of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability know, in the book’s fourth chapter I examine criticisms that feminist philosophers and theorists have directed at Foucault according to which his claims rely upon and reproduce androcentric, sexist, and masculinist biases. In a post at Discrimination and Disadvantage, I summarized remarks that I […]