Schliesser on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability: An Update

I’ve been busy the last few days preparing both a talk that I’m giving to the Philosophy Club at Stetson University later today and the seventh-anniversary installment of Dialogues on Disability that will be posted on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY this coming Wednesday. So, I haven’t had time to put together a response to Eric Schliesser’s commentary […]

Schliesser on Tremain on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

Over at Digressions & Impressions, Eric Schliesser has written a critical commentary on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability that might interest some of you. The post also draws attention to In the Shadow of Justice by Kat Forrester. The title of the post indicates that it is the first part of Schliesser’s discussion of […]

New Review of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

A new review of my book Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability (Tabetha K. Violet) appears in the Spring 2020 issue of IJFAB: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (vol. 13, no, 1, pp. 174-177). You can find the review online here. Links to a review of the book that appeared in the APA […]

Feminist Philosophy of Disability, Women’s History Month, and IWD

March is Women’s History Month and March 8th is International Women’s Day (IWD). In recognition of these occasions, the University of Michigan Press has applied a discount to a number of its publications relevant to women and feminism, including to my book, Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability. My book, the manuscript of which won […]

The Fallacy of the Good Philosopher-Activist

Julinna Oxley’s article “How to Be a Good Philosopher-Activist” is the focus of a post over at Daily Nous. I hadn’t previously read Oxley’s article, so I’m glad that it’s showcased on the Daily Nous blog.  Although I read the article quickly, I derived from doing so the impression that it’s timely, instructive, and provocative. […]

Reconfiguring Values: A Riposte to Agnes Callard

In Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, I argue that disability is a complex and complicated apparatus of power rather than a personal property, attribute, or difference, as assumed on the individualized and medicalized conceptions of disability that most philosophers (including most philosophers of disability) hold. In order to make this argument, I employ Foucault’s […]