Social Ontology and Reductive Conceptions of Philosophy of Disability (The Consequences for Disabled Philosophers)

Over the weekend, disabled philosopher Johnathan Flowers once again tweeted a thread about the ableism of the profession and the exclusion of disabled philosophers of disability. In the course of the thread, Johnathan pointed out how philosophers of disability aren’t recognized as (say) doing metaphysics, as philosophers of language, as politiical philosophers, and so on, […]

Forthcoming Edited Collection on Philosophy of Disability

In a post at the end of 2020, I mentioned that early in 2021 I would send out invitations to a pathbreaking edited collection on philosophy of disability. The invitations have been sent out and confirmed; and I have assigned a title to the book. So, here are a few details that I can share […]

Why Nursing-Home Incarceration Must End

On Wednesday of this week, the Auditor General of Ontario, Bonnie Lysyk, released her report on the catastrophic events that have occurred in Ontario nursing homes during the past pandemic year and the Ford Progressive Conservative government’s response to them. The report identified systemic underfunding, staff shortages, lack of PPE, lack of infection control, shared […]

Philosophy of Disability, Conceptual Engineering, and the Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex

The writing below constitutes an excerpt of the penultimate version of my article “Philosophy of Disability, Conceptual Engineering, and the Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex,” which will appear in Philosophies of Disability and the Global Pandemic, a special issue that I’m guest editing for The International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies. The issue should be out by June […]

Letter to the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs of the Government of Canada in Opposition to Bill C-7

This morning, as per Catherine Frazee’s request, I submitted a letter to the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs of the Canadian Government. The letter articulates my opposition to Bill C-7, which would expand access to medically-assisted suicide (“MAID”) for disabled people. Given the dearth of disabled philosophers (of disability) in Canadian philosophy, […]

The Biopolitics of COVID-19

Learning From The Virus By Paul B. Preciado If Michel Foucault had survived AIDS in 1984 and had stayed alive until the invention of effective antiretroviral therapy, he would be ninety-three years old today. Would he have agreed to confine himself in his apartment on rue de Vaugirard in Paris? The first philosopher of history to […]

COVID-19, Nursing Homes, and Public Philosophy

At the beginning of April, I wrote an essay (here) for BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY about COVID -19, nursing homes, and vulnerability, in which I argued that the escalating number of deaths in nursing homes was a consequence of the nature of the institutions themselves rather than due to some inherent vulnerability, that is, some property or […]