Feminist Philosophy of Disability: A Genealogical Intervention

Today is International Women’s Day; so, I’m happy to tell you that my article “Feminist Philosophy of Disability: A Genealogical Intervention” has now been published in The Southern Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 57, No. 1, pp. 132-158. The article draws upon my book Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability and also identifies feminist philosophy of […]

Alcoff on Rape and Consistency: A Survivor Speaks

In October of last year, I wrote a post at Discrimination and Disadvantage about how I was sexually assaulted by a fellow graduate student when I was in grad school. The post was entitled “Testimony, Uncorroborated” and was a response to some of the criticisms that were in circulation about Christine Blasey-Ford who had, in […]

Foucault, Feminist Philosophy of Disability, Pacific APA, and Wordgathering

In January, I posted some thoughts about writing my book Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, noting that these ruminations were preliminary ideas that would take shape in the response that I give in the symposium on the book at the upcoming Pacific APA. Michael Northen, editor of Wordgathering: A Journal of Disability Poetry and […]

Elitism and the Engines of Democracy

I have long thought that the impetus to “diversify” the student and faculty bodies of elite institutions such as Yale, Oxford, Princeton, Stanford, and Cambridge is not as it first appears nor are the consequences of this movement. That is, I have long thought that the (neoliberal) motivation to increase the demographic diversity of students […]

Beyond Inclusive Syllabi

[Occasionally, I will (re)post to BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY essays, data, or other information that I previously posted on the Discrimination and Disadvantage blog. The following post appeared on Discrimination and Disadvantage  in October of last year.] Nondisabled white women are generally included whenever philosophers wish to identify various underrepresented groups in the profession. Indeed, these women are generally given priority […]

Up Against Power and Prestige With Puar

I (and others) have long thought that, for the most part, Tom Shakespeare’s and Rosemarie Garland Thomson’s respective work in disability studies has lost its critical edge. Yet both Shakespeare and Garland Thomson continue to be widely regarded as icons in the disability studies circles of their respective countries (England and the United States) and […]