Notes on Khader's Decolonizing Universalism and the Problematization of Disability in Feminist Philosophy

In Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, I aimed to denaturalize disability by arguing that disability is an apparatus of power rather than a natural human difference, personal attribute, or biological characteristic. My argument is thus distinct from the approaches to disability that disabled philosophers of disability such as Barnes, Silvers, and Stramondo take and […]

The Aesthetics and Politics of Depression

In Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, I call for a conceptual revolution with respect to disability, arguing that disability is an apparatus of force relations rather than a natural human attribute, biological difference, personal characteristic, or property of individuals. In order to denaturalize and politicize disability in this way, I examine the problematization (as […]

What's Ahead: Against Natural(izing) Disability

Much of my writing, teaching, service, and activism in philosophy has been designed to undermine a cluster of assumptions about the relation between nature and nurture, that is, a cluster of assumptions about the relation between biology and society, assumptions that remain embedded in philosophical discourses, variously naturalizing disability, gender, race, and other apparatuses of […]

Asylum, Credible Fear Tests, and Colonial Violence (Guest Post)

Guest Post by Elena Ruíz and Ezgi Sertler* Let’s start with what asylum is: an international protection mechanism that individuals seeking “refuge” from violence can use to obtain official refugee status in another country. The term we use to refer to forcibly displaced people in general – refugee – is different than the legal refugee […]

Reviews of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

In the past week, two very positive reviews of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability have appeared (well, if they appeared before last week, I was unaware that they had been published). I was happy to read that, for the most part, the two reviews focus on and draw out disparate aspects of the book. […]

Situating Disabled Philosophers and Philosophy of Disability in Philosophy

Presented to Disabling Normativities Conference, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, Oct. 2, 2019 [Good morning. To increase the accessibility of my presentation, I’ve now posted it to BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, the philosophy blog that I co-coordinate. So, if you have a cellphone, a laptop, a tablet, or some other device with you and you’d like […]

“Gas-lighting, Discrimination, and Humiliation: The Day-to-Day Experience of a Disabled Academic” by Kay Inckle

This morning, Zara Bain (interviewed for Dialogues on Disability in May 2015) posted the article below on Twitter. The article, which was published in February of this year, deserves wide circulation. ________________________________________________________________________________ Gas-lighting, Discrimination, and Humiliation: The Day-to-Day Experience of a Disabled Academic By Kay Inckle “The university might deem it reasonable for you to […]

Review of Method, Substance, and the Future of African Philosophy

The book review of Edwin Etieyibo’s Method, Substance, and the Future of African Philosophy posted below originally appeared at Social Epistemology and Review and Reply Collective. The author of the review is Anke Graness. The full citation for the review is: Graness, Anke. “African Philosophy and History.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 7, no. 10 (2018): […]