Report and Video of Disabling Philosophy in the Canadian Context and More

Our symposium in the Canadian Philosophical Association meeting online of Congress 2022 was a huge success. The session was well attended, the presentations were wonderful, and the environment that the participants and attendees created was especially unique for a philosophy conference. I am thrilled with the way that the event unfolded. I posted transcripts of […]

MAiD, (Canadian) Bioethicists, and the Banality of Evil

Two or three generations from now, philosophers will look back in horror and shame at the role that Canadian bioethicists and philosophers played in the normalization of medically assisted suicide (a.k.a. MAiD) in Canada. In the seventh-anniversary installment of Dialogues on Disability that I posted last month, Isaac Jiang, with whom I composed the installment, […]

A Brief Review of Hay’s Think Like a Feminist

Yesterday marked International Women’s Day and thus my Twitter feed was replete with neoliberal corporate and other ableist governmental discourses about women’s achievements and goals to commemorate the occasion. Several tweets about disabled women by The Disability Justice Network of Ontario and other transformative organizations were a welcome reprieve from the onslaught of nondisabled feminist […]

Philosophies of Disability and the Global Pandemic

If you were away from your computer early in the New Year, you may have missed my previous post about the special issue of International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies on this theme that I guest edited. The issue, which is open access, includes my introduction to the issue and my article on philosophy of […]

Peter Singer and the Mystique of Bioethics, Part 2

As I indicated in Part 1, although feminist bioethicists and so-called disability bioethicists too insist that Peter Singer’s claims about disability are morally reprehensible, they maintain that the field of bioethics itself is a noble and progressive enterprise within which one can selectively adopt a neutral stance on certain bioethical issues (Scully 2021). Indeed, disability […]

Peter Singer and The Mystique of Bioethics, Part 1

In recent years, philosophers have increasingly engaged with each other in impassioned discussions about academic freedom in the discipline and profession of philosophy and across academia more broadly, as well as participated in heated debates with members of the broader public about freedom of speech in society more generally. The topics around which the most […]

On This International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The sterilization and extermination of disabled people by the Nazis during the Second World War are often overlooked in remembrances of the Holocaust. Indeed, although many disabled people died in Auschwitz and other camps, thousands of disabled people were sterilized and murdered before the establishment of the camps, as disabled author Kenny Fries, among others, […]

Why Have (Feminist) Philosophers Ignored Nursing Home Incarceration?

My article “Philosophy of Disability, Conceptual Engineering, and the Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex” appears in the recently published special issue of International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies that I guest edited. The article is in partictular the culmination of research that I conducted on nursing homes and other so-called long-term care institutions from early 2000 to mid […]

Dea, Data, and the Disabling Canadian University

This post extends a thread about disability and data collection that I began in an earlier post (go here). I had intended to continue my consideration of APDA/Eric Schwitzgebel’s discussion about disability and the demographics of philosophy and of Shannon Dea’s discussion about disability and the post-pandemic university in Canada after I examined the fuller […]