Biopower, Normalization, and Slippery Slopes

[This post previously appeared on Discrimination and Disadvantage. In an upcoming post, I will discuss how the subfield of bioethics has shaped Canadian philosophy and how the predominance of the subfield of bioethics in Canadian philosophy is intertwined with prestige bias. An earlier post on prestige bias in Canadian philosophy can be found here.] ____________________________________________________ […]

Is "The Right to Die" Racialized Biopolitics?

[This post originally appeared at Discrimination and Disadvantage. In one respect, the title of the post was redundant: biopolitics are always racialized.] _________________________________________________ My post earlier in the week drew attention to the imbrication of the sub-field of bioethics in the workings of biopower and neoliberal biopolitics. I noted how biopolitics has produced discussions in bioethics that […]

The Biopolitics of Bioethics

[This post originally appeared at Discrimination and Disadvantage.] In a chapter of my forthcoming book, I argue that (most of the) claims advanced in the sub-field of mainstream bioethics and even feminist bioethics rely upon an outdated conception of power that manifests in ideas about “choice,” “informed consent,” and “autonomy.” (Most) bioethicists assume what Foucault referred […]

Reviews of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

In the past week, two very positive reviews of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability have appeared (well, if they appeared before last week, I was unaware that they had been published). I was happy to read that, for the most part, the two reviews focus on and draw out disparate aspects of the book. […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 3

This series is intended to flesh out some of the remarks that I made in a pivotal paragraph of my reply to commentators in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability. In the previous post in this series, I returned to the paragraph in order to consider the remark according to […]

Commemorating Foucault I: Symposium on Hall’s The Bioethics of Enhancement

Michel Foucault died unexpectedly 35 years ago today. To honour Foucault’s memory and the rich body of work that he bequeathed to us, I am reposting two symposiums that were previously posted at Discrimination and Disadvantage: a symposium on my Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability that took place at the annual meeting of CSWIP […]

More On How Bioethics Fosters Homogeneity in Philosophy and Society in General

It would be difficult to overestimate the constraining effects that the PhilPapers database generates for the development of critical philosophical work on disability. Nor could one overstate the deleterious consequences that accrue to disabled philosophers due to the structure of a spinoff of PhilPapers, namely, PhilJobs, the leading job board in philosophy whose architecture mirrors […]

Neoliberalism, Bioethics, and the Apparatus of Disability in a German Context

In the fifth chapter of Foucault and the Government of Disability, I assert that philosophers and theorists of disability should recognize that the subfield of bioethics is a neoliberal technology of government, that is, a concerted biopolitical enterprise whose aim is normalization (and hence control) of populations. Given the scope of my critique of bioethics […]