Back on the Anti-Ableist Hobby Horse Again

Question: What do Licia Carlson, Andy Clark, Leslie Francis, Sara Goering, Chris Kaposy, Serene Khader, Eva Kittay, Will Kymlicka, Monique Lanoix, Joel Reynolds, Cynthia Stark, and Jonathan Wolff have in common? Answer: All of them are nondisabled philosophers whose careers have been advanced with publications on disability. None of them has a disabled philosopher of […]

Six Things You Should Know About Diversity in Philosophy, the Apparatus of Disability, and the Status of Disabled Philosophers

No department with a nondisabled philosopher of disability on its faculty has a disabled philosopher of disability on its faculty. There is not a single disabled philosopher of disability employed full-time in a Canadian philosophy department. There are no disabled philosophers of disability in the departments in which the leading advocates for diversity and inclusion […]

Ableism and the Epistemic Supremacy of Nondisabled Philosophers

Whether on the street or in the mall, the first lessons about disabled people that (nondisabled) parents and other (nondisabled) adults generally convey to children are in some respects prohibitive, usually imparted in hushed tones: don’t stare at that handicapped person; don’t look at her like that; it’s not polite to stare; just act like […]

Abstract for My Keynote Address at the Disabling Normativities Conference, University of Witwatersrand, Oct. 1-3, 2019

Here is the abstract for my Keynote Address at the Disabling Normativities conference in Johannesburg in October: Philosophy is the most conservative and homogeneous discipline across the humanities and social sciences with respect to areas of inquiry and specialization. The homogeneity of the topics and questions studied in philosophy is, furthermore, co-constitutive with the homogeneity […]