“Gas-lighting, Discrimination, and Humiliation: The Day-to-Day Experience of a Disabled Academic” by Kay Inckle

This morning, Zara Bain (interviewed for Dialogues on Disability in May 2015) posted the article below on Twitter. The article, which was published in February of this year, deserves wide circulation. ________________________________________________________________________________ Gas-lighting, Discrimination, and Humiliation: The Day-to-Day Experience of a Disabled Academic By Kay Inckle “The university might deem it reasonable for you to […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 4

In this fourth post of Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future—a series of posts designed to explain claims that I made in response to commentators in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability—I want to elaborate my claim that naturalization of disability in philosophy has expanded in new directions. My central […]

CFP: Stanford Graduate Conference in Political Theory, Stanford, Jan. 24-25, 2020 (deadline: Sept. 15, 2019)

The political science graduate students at Stanford University will host a political theory conference on January 24-25, 2020 in Stanford’s Encina Hall. The keynote speaker will be Professor Wendy Brown (University of California, Berkeley). Approximately 6-8 graduate students will be invited to present their papers in panel format to an interdisciplinary group of faculty, post-docs, and students. Papers from […]

CFA: Feminist-Pragmatist Colloquium: Looking Back to Move Forward, St. John Fisher College, NY, Nov. 14-17, 2019 (deadline: Jun. 15, 2019)

DATES: Thursday, November 14 – Sunday, November 17, 2019 LOCATION: St. John Fisher College (Rochester, New York) with excursions to historic Mt. Hope Cemetery, Susan B. Anthony House, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park (Seneca Falls), sites of interest related to Frederick Douglass, and more. We are pleased to announce the Call for Abstracts for […]

Final CFA: Epistemic Injustice in the Aftermath of Collective Wrongdoing Workshop, University of Bern, Dec. 6-7, 2019 (deadline: Apr. 30, 2019)

Confirmed Speakers: Maria Baghramian (University College Dublin)Jennifer Lackey (Northwestern University)José Medina (Northwestern University)Gaile Pohlhaus (Miami University)Imge Oranli (Koç University)Melanie Altanian (University of Bern) I am inviting papers on the topic of epistemic injustice broadly conceived, including testimonial injustice, hermeneutical injustice and ignorance, either applied to a case study of collective wrongdoing such as crimes against humanity, […]

Signs of Blind People

If you used Google to get here and you are sighted, you might have noticed that the graphic for Google Doodle today commemorates the introduction of tenji block on railway platforms in Okayama, Japan, fifty-two years ago today. “Tenji block” is the name that Seiichi Miyake gave to the tactile paving slabs that he invented […]

Is This Post Substantive Enough?

After Justin Weinberg called my work on the metaphysics of disability “bullshit” in a comment on the Daily Nous blog back in the Spring of 2017, that blog began to rub me the wrong way. Since then, I have commented on it only once or twice. Nevertheless, I often glance at the posts on Daily […]

CFP: Political Philosophy and the Future of Capitalism, Waseda University, June 15-17, 2019 (deadline: Mar. 15, 2019)

A workshop on the theme Political Philosophy and the Future of Capitalism will be held at Waseda University, in Tokyo, from June 15 to 17, 2019. Confirmed speakers:Chiara Cordelli (University of Chicago)Martin O’Neill (University of York)Lucas Stanczyk (Harvard University) Questions about capitalism and its many discontents have acquired a new urgency in recent years. Economic […]

Community Education Project: A Prison Education

I teach in prison. I do so as an expression of my belief that as a professor, I have power; but, this power can and should be loosened from the traditional campus and redirected to create space for incarcerated students to build a classroom. The classroom I teach in, and the program I help lead, […]

Academic Ableism’s Purpose

Following on Saturday’s post about inaccessibility at Yale University, this post draws attention to the purpose that the inaccessibility of the university serves. Readers and listeners of this post might think that the previous sentence was misworded or inaptly phrased. Why would I suggest that the inaccessibility of the university serves a purpose? The sort of […]