CFP: Asian Philosophical Texts (deadline: Oct. 30, 2020)

The “Asian Philosophical Texts” book series, published by Mimesis International, aims at providing a platform for scholars in the field of Asian Studies and world philosophies to both discuss and perform the task of translating Asian philosophical texts into European languages. The book series grew out of the Asian Philosophical Texts conferences (Brussels 2018, Chiba 2019), organized as part of an international project involving universities from Europe and Japan.

The series is edited by Takeshi Morisato (Sun Yat-Sen University, China) and Roman Pașca (Kyoto University, Japan). The first volume, Asian Philosophical Texts: Exploring Hidden Sources, was published in March 2020 (description below; TOC and Introduction available in attachment), and the second one is scheduled for this summer.

We have decided not to organize the conference this year due to the corona virus pandemic, but we plan to continue with the publication of the book series. We are therefore opening this call for contributions for the next volume in the series, as detailed below.

● Topic: Asian philosophical texts in the broadest sense of the term. This includes, but is not limited to, Chinese, Cambodian, Indian, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Vietnamese, etc., philosophical texts from any period. Any papers on the philosophy of translation, critical analyses of existing translations, or ongoing translation projects are welcome. Translations should be accompanied by an introduction. Contributions from early-career scholars are more than welcome. All contributions will be peer-reviewed.

● Length: 6,000–10,000 words.

● Deadline for submission: October 30, 2020

For submissions, more details and any inquiries, please contact the editors at takeshi.morisato[at]gmail.com and romanpasca[at]gmail.com.

***

Description of the first volume, “Asian Philosophical Texts: Exploring Hidden Sources”:

The present volume compiles translations of hitherto neglected texts in Asian philosophical traditions, along with several critical essays dealing with the philosophical issues of translating them into western languages.

As the inaugural volume to a proposed series dedicated to making hidden primary sources of Asian philosophies available to the wider audience in western academia and beyond, this book treats diverse primary sources written by a broad range of thinkers from various historical periods and intellectual traditions, including the Indian, Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, among others. The translations, accompanied by critical essays, will shed light on major philosophical movements as Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism and others, thereby demonstrating the multilayered development of intellectual traditions in Asia.

Takeshi Morisato is Research Associate at the Department of Philosophy at Sun Yat-Sen University in China. He is the author of Faith and Reason in Continental and Japanese Philosophy (2019) and currently serving as the editor of the European Journal of Japanese Philosophy (EJJP), the series editor of the “Studies in Japanese Philosophy” (Chisokudo Publications), the regional editor of the “Bloomsbury Introduction to World Philosophies,” and the associate editor of the Journal of East Asian Philosophy.

Roman Pașca is Assistant Professor at the Department of Japanese Philosophy at Kyoto University’s Graduate School of Letters. He currently serves as vice-president of the European Network of Japanese Philosophy (ENOJP). He has published extensively on Japanese premodern philosophy and has translated numerous works from and into Japanese, English, French and Romanian. He is a member of the editorial boards of several academic journals in Europe and Japan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.