The Reputation of Canadian Philosophy is in the Balance

On social media platforms all across Canada and the United States, academics, activists, lawyers, physicians, and students, have come alive to the eugenic impetus of MAiD and its latest incarnation, Bill C-7, as well as to the philosophical underpinnings of these policies. Indeed, as I have noted in previous posts on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, eugenics is […]

Jama and Downie on MAiD

In previous posts, I have drawn attention to the creative and important work of Sarah Jama and the Disability Justice Network of Ontario (DJNO). For instance, I alerted readers/listeners of BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY to the recent “Death By Coercion” webinar that DJNO organized to push back against the way that the perspectives and experiences of Black, […]

Open Questions in Social Ontology

Hsiang-Yun Chen and Sally Haslanger have just edited an special issue on Social Meaning and Reality for the EurAmerica Journal and it features an article by yours truly. This is how they summarize it on their introduction to the special issue: Just as there is a large variety of social categories that an individual can […]

Philosophy of Disability, Conceptual Engineering, and the Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex

The writing below constitutes an excerpt of the penultimate version of my article “Philosophy of Disability, Conceptual Engineering, and the Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex,” which will appear in Philosophies of Disability and the Global Pandemic, a special issue that I’m guest editing for The International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies. The issue should be out by June […]

Some of Your Favourite BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY Posts of 2020

By popular demand, I once again present you with a list of some of BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY’s most read/listened to posts of the past year. The year was memorable in a host of heart-wrenching ways, many of which our blog captured. In 2020, you wanted more of: January: Notes on Khader’s Decolonizing Universalism and the Problematization […]

Capitalism and Chronic Fatigue (guest post by Michelle Ciurria)

The essay below was presented at Philosophy, Disability and Social Change on Friday, December 11, 2020. _____________________________________________________________________________ Capitalism and Chronic Fatigue By Michelle Ciurria In this presentation, I am going to offer a biopolitical explanation of chronic fatigue syndrome or CFS. First, I’ll explain what CFS is. Then, I’ll explain why I consider CFS to […]

The Morality of Risk and Harm

there is not one such thing as being right. We use normative language like ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ for many purposes – to talk about what we should do from a first person perspective and to talk about how to judge other people’s actions from a third person perspectives (singular and plural), about who to praise and who to blame, about how to deal with the consequences of our actions and about how to assign responsibilities, etc.

Opposition to Bill C-7 and Too Many Letters of Reference

No, this post isn’t taking on the important work done on The Philosophers’ Cocoon blog by advising philosophy job applicants about the appropriate contents of their dossier. Rather this post draws upon past interventions that I’ve made on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY and on the earlier Discrimination and Disadvantage blog (here, here, and here) to reiterate that […]