I’m Disabled and Need a Ventilator to Live. Am I Expendable During This Pandemic?

In the fifth chapter of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, I develop the argument that bioethics is a eugenic technology of government that facilitates normalization of the population through strategies such as “quality of life” assessments. I also argue that the intentional and nonsubjective forms of power that motivate bioethics require the exclusion of […]

COVID-19 and The Naturalization of Vulnerability

Since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, and especially since its effects began to be more directly experienced in Canada, I have carefully watched growing discussions about the pandemic, “seniors,” disabled people, “vulnerability,” and nursing homes unfold on social media and in the mainstream popular press. In particular, I am attentive to the ways that […]

Happy Trans Day of Visibility!

Today is Trans Day of Visibility, so it seems like the ideal time to remind you that in December of last year, Ray Briggs wrote a fantastic guest post for BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY entitled, “Practical Suggestions for My Cis Colleagues in Philosophy.” You can find Ray’s guest post on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY here. On Facebook, Ray linked […]

Facing the COVID-19 Crisis in Japan With a Disability*

By  Mark Bookman and Michael Gillan Peckitt Michael [The Limping Philosopher]: I am an academic living in Kobe and I work at Osaka University. I have cerebral palsy and, while I can get around with the aid of a walking stick, I have very little movement in the left side of my body. My disability also […]

COVID-19 Pandemic: A Crisis of Care*

By The Care Collective (Andreas Chatzidakis, Jamie Hakim, Jo Littler, Catherine Rottenberg, Lynne Segal) We are in a global crisis: a new historical moment. The days pass, the virus expands its reach, fatalities rise and the world goes into unprecedented lockdown. Yet the current crisis is not only the result of a new pathogen circulating around […]

Biopolitics and Coronavirus, or Don't Forget Foucault (How Could We?)

An excerpt from the essay “Biopolitics and Coronavirus, or Don’t Forget Foucault” by Felipe Demetri: “What the coronavirus epidemic shows us is more the strength of Michel Foucault’s explanatory scheme than the current necro-thanatopolitical strain of interpretations. We all know that Foucault saw biopower as a series of events, from theoretical ones to concrete practices, […]

JSTOR Teaching Pandemics Syllabus

Readings on the history of quarantine, contagious disease, viruses, infections, and epidemics offer important context for the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. From JSTOR: “Last week, the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic. In an effort to slow the spread of the disease, schools and universities across the world have transitioned […]

Buying Ableism and Shit During the Pandemic

On social media, on TV, in the mainstream press, etc. endless reports have appeared about people “hoarding” toilet paper, getting into physical altercations in Costco stores over packages of toilet paper, searching for hours online to purchase toilet paper, driving around their deserted cities to find a package, and so on. I’ve also seen a […]

Back on the Anti-Ableist Hobby Horse Again

Question: What do Licia Carlson, Andy Clark, Leslie Francis, Sara Goering, Chris Kaposy, Serene Khader, Eva Kittay, Will Kymlicka, Monique Lanoix, Joel Reynolds, Cynthia Stark, and Jonathan Wolff have in common? Answer: All of them are nondisabled philosophers whose careers have been advanced with publications on disability. None of them has a disabled philosopher of […]

The Fallacy of the Good Philosopher-Activist

Julinna Oxley’s article “How to Be a Good Philosopher-Activist” is the focus of a post over at Daily Nous. I hadn’t previously read Oxley’s article, so I’m glad that it’s showcased on the Daily Nous blog.  Although I read the article quickly, I derived from doing so the impression that it’s timely, instructive, and provocative. […]