Avalonian and the Courage of a Pseudonym

One of the primary reasons why anonymous and pseudonymous comments should be disallowed on Daily Nous is that such comments enable their crafters to avoid responsibility or repercussions for their remarks when they should instead face these consequences. The commenter to Daily Nous who uses the pseudonym “Avalonian” is a case in point. That is […]

The Singer/Lindauer Entry Won! But Why?

As per comments that I have made in the Teaching Practical and Applied Ethics Facebook group, let me say this: The winner of The Splintered Mind contest (go here) that solicited arguments designed to convince people to donate to charity, namely, the Singer/Lindauer entry about an effort to prevent “blindness,” reproduces ableism and ableist biases […]

The Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex

In a post at the beginning of April, I addressed the way that vulnerability was naturalized in reports in the mainstream press, on bioethics blogs, and elsewhere about the dramatically increasing number of COVID-19 outbreaks in nursing homes in Ontario, across Canada, and elsewhere. My argument in the post drew attention to the systemic ageism […]

Beyond “High-Risk”: Statement on Disability and Campus Re-openings

Accessible Campus Action Alliance  Jump to:  The Issues Beyond the “High-risk” Framework for Accommodations Best Practices for Campus Re-Openings Prioritizing Relations of Care The Issues  As scholars of disability, health equity, institutional policy and inclusion; as disabled faculty who have spent careers negotiating legal and institutional processes of accommodation; and as allies committed to uplifting […]

The Skin We’re In: Racism in Canada

In previous posts (e.g., here), I cited remarks that award-winning journalist and activist Desmond Cole has made about the “magical thinking” that enables white people in Canada to convince themselves that racism does not exist in Canada. Last year, Cole made a documentary entitled “The Skin We’re In: Pulling Back the Curtain On Racism in […]

My Journey In Our Struggle (Guest Post)

My Journey In Our Struggle  By   Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman, Ph.D. It began, for me, in an inpatient psychiatric unit. I had been sectioned. Why do I begin narrating my journey at this milestone? •    I survived. Not all of us do. I live and work “In The Wake,” to borrow an idea from Professor Christina Sharpe, of those persons […]

Interviews with Black & Indigenous Disabled Philosophers

June 2015: Dialogues on Disability: Shelley Tremain Interviews Tommy Curry August 2015: Dialogues on Disability: Shelley Tremain Interviews Anne Waters September 2015: Dialogues on Disability: Shelley Tremain Interviews Ray Aldred December 2015: Dialogues on Disability: Shelley Tremain Interviews Damion Kareem Scott September 2016: Dialogues on Disability: Shelley Tremain Interviews Elvis Imafidon November 2016: Dialogues on […]

More Ableism, Sexism, and Misogyny in Philosophy

As many of you will by now know, over the past week, I have been the target of ableist, sexist, and misogynistic harassment, condescension, and intimidation in the comments to a post at Daily Nous about free speech at Oxford. You will find the post and comments to it here. The harassment and intimidation persisted […]

The Biopolitics of COVID-19

Learning From The Virus By Paul B. Preciado If Michel Foucault had survived AIDS in 1984 and had stayed alive until the invention of effective antiretroviral therapy, he would be ninety-three years old today. Would he have agreed to confine himself in his apartment on rue de Vaugirard in Paris? The first philosopher of history to […]

Expressions of Solidarity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Yesterday, Justin Weinberg put a post on Daily Nous that comprises a public statement entitled “COVID-19: A Statement of Academic Solidarity” initiated by Seyla Benhabib, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Judith Butler, Naomi Klein, Harold Varmus, Donna Haraway, and Nell Irvin Painter. The statement, which was the subject of an earlier article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, […]