Signs of Blind People

If you used Google to get here and you are sighted, you might have noticed that the graphic for Google Doodle today commemorates the introduction of tenji block on railway platforms in Okayama, Japan, fifty-two years ago today. “Tenji block” is the name that Seiichi Miyake gave to the tactile paving slabs that he invented […]

Is This Post Substantive Enough?

After Justin Weinberg called my work on the metaphysics of disability “bullshit” in a comment on the Daily Nous blog back in the Spring of 2017, that blog began to rub me the wrong way. Since then, I have commented on it only once or twice. Nevertheless, I often glance at the posts on Daily […]

Alcoff on Rape and Consistency: A Survivor Speaks

In October of last year, I wrote a post at Discrimination and Disadvantage about how I was sexually assaulted by a fellow graduate student when I was in grad school. The post was entitled “Testimony, Uncorroborated” and was a response to some of the criticisms that were in circulation about Christine Blasey-Ford who had, in […]

Mind, Attention, & World: Themes in Indian & Buddhist Philosophical Theory, NYU, Apr. 25-26, 2019

April 25-26, 2019  19 Washington Square North New York, NY 10011  Location: Events Space (2nd  Floor)                                       Convenor: Jonardon Ganeri, NYU (646) 316-7297 April 25, 2019|DAY 1 8:45 am – 9:00 am Coffee & Welcome  (Jonardon Ganeri NYU) 9:00 am – 10:45 am Panel 1. Attending to Oneself Chair: Nic Bommarito (Buffalo) 9:00 am – 9:50 […]

Back to Campus Post Baby and Post Parental Leave

I am back on campus this spring after giving birth to my first child. We named her Mara, and she is now six months old. I am an assistant professor and was lucky enough to cobble together generous parental leave for the fall of 2018. I delivered on September 9th. I used a combination of […]

Helen De Cruz and Prestige Bias (in Canadian Philosophy Departments)

I greatly admire Helen De Cruz who, in my view, exhibits a genuine commitment to diversity and inclusivity in philosophy, something that is rarer than most philosophers want to acknowledge. I especially appreciate the empirical and analytical work on prestige bias in philosophy that Helen has initiated and developed. In particular, I want to commend […]

Elitism and the Engines of Democracy

I have long thought that the impetus to “diversify” the student and faculty bodies of elite institutions such as Yale, Oxford, Princeton, Stanford, and Cambridge is not as it first appears nor are the consequences of this movement. That is, I have long thought that the (neoliberal) motivation to increase the demographic diversity of students […]

Beyond Inclusive Syllabi

[Occasionally, I will (re)post to BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY essays, data, or other information that I previously posted on the Discrimination and Disadvantage blog. The following post appeared on Discrimination and Disadvantage  in October of last year.] Nondisabled white women are generally included whenever philosophers wish to identify various underrepresented groups in the profession. Indeed, these women are generally given priority […]