Neoliberalism, Bioethics, and the Apparatus of Disability in a German Context

In the fifth chapter of Foucault and the Government of Disability, I assert that philosophers and theorists of disability should recognize that the subfield of bioethics is a neoliberal technology of government, that is, a concerted biopolitical enterprise whose aim is normalization (and hence control) of the population. Given the scope of my critique of […]

Disability, Identity, Role Models, and Philosophy

The excellent article copied below was penned by none other than disabled philosopher Joe Stramondo. Among other things, I was very happy to read about the important role that Paul Steven Miller played in the development of Joe’s identity as disabled. I am fortunate to have had a couple of memorable conversations with Paul at […]

Game of Thrones and Disability: Doing and Undoing Ableism

In my recent post “Mystify: Michael Hutchence and Disability,” I noted that a great deal of work has been done in disability studies and philosophy of disability on ableist representations in film and literature. Critical work on representations of disabled people and disability on television and in advertisement is also a steadily fruitful field of […]

Mystify: Michael Hutchence and Disability

Two of Melinda’s first posts on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY are film reviews, a review of both the depiction of (so-called) mental illness and use of blindness as metaphor in Bird Box and a review of representations of disability in Bird Box, Hush, and A Quiet Place. These reviews build upon Melinda’s earlier work on depictions of […]

Some Things to Consider About Disability and Diversity in Philosophy

As readers and listeners of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability know, in the book’s fourth chapter I examine criticisms that feminist philosophers and theorists have directed at Foucault according to which his claims rely upon and reproduce androcentric, sexist, and masculinist biases. In a post at Discrimination and Disadvantage, I summarized remarks that I […]

The Future of Feminist Philosophy and Opportunities Squandered

When I recently said “goodbye” to someone whom I’m wild about, I screwed it up. Come to think of it, on that occasion, I didn’t do a great job of “hello” either. But the farewell was certainly a missed opportunity. I said something like “It means so much to me to have your friendship.” Which […]

The Ugly Truth of Being a Black Professor in America

The article by George Yancy copied below appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education on April 29, 2018. You can read or listen to the original article here. _________________________________________________________ By George Yancy APRIL 29, 2018 “Dear Nigger Professor.” That was the beginning of a message that was sent to me. There is nothing to be cherished […]

Indigenization Efforts Vary Widely on Canadian Campuses, Study Finds

The article below appears in the April 16, 2019 issue of University Affairs. Institutions have focused mainly on Indigenous inclusion, but that’s only one end of a spectrum of policies needed for reconciliation, researchers argue. By Natalie Samson When it comes to Indigenization at Canadian universities, most have focused on Indigenous hiring and student recruitment, […]

Disability, Discourse, Demographics at the Pacific APA

I have copied below the response I gave yesterday in the symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability. ___________________________________________________________________ To increase the accessibility of this symposium and provide a context in which it can be situated, I’d like to begin my remarks by explaining why I wrote the book, offering a rationale for its […]