Disability is Social, Political, and Linked to Epistemic Injustice: An Academic Exploration and Personal Reflection (Guest Post)

Guest Post By David, Incarcerated at Tomoka Correctional Institution in Daytona Beach, FL   “[T]he risks associated with disability are widely understood to be merely or mostly biological, rather than, as I understand it, significantly social and political” (Hall 2016, 10). This quote lays the foundation for the argument I would like to raise about […]

Notes on a Recent Appointment with a Psychiatrist (Guest Post)

Guest Post by Anonymous Philosophy Student I will be attending a philosophy MA program in the UK soon, and as I have never been to the country, I planned a preliminary trip to the city in which my university resides to orient myself. I was soon reminded of my severe fear of flight. I canceled […]

Sexual Harassment in Philosophy, Disability, and the Dream of a Common Language: A Response to Dowell and Sobel

Most mainstream philosophers and many white feminist philosophers probably don’t know that Kimberlé Crenshaw introduced and developed her idea of intersectionality in writing on women of colour and violence. In “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color,” for example, Crenshaw argues that feminist work on domestic and sexual violence that […]

“Gas-lighting, Discrimination, and Humiliation: The Day-to-Day Experience of a Disabled Academic” by Kay Inckle

This morning, Zara Bain (interviewed for Dialogues on Disability in May 2015) posted the article below on Twitter. The article, which was published in February of this year, deserves wide circulation. ________________________________________________________________________________ Gas-lighting, Discrimination, and Humiliation: The Day-to-Day Experience of a Disabled Academic By Kay Inckle “The university might deem it reasonable for you to […]

Hurricane prep, again

Hurricane preparation in Florida is an annual affair, at least. A lot of people in my area do not have enough money or space to prepare adequately for storms in advance. And, of course, when it comes to purchasing items once the news hits that a hurricane or major storm is headed our way, essential […]

Some Notes on Dembroff on Hacking, Disability, and Kinds of People

This morning I quickly looked at Robin Dembroff’s “Real Talk on the Metaphysics of Gender,” which is forthcoming in a special issue of Philosophical Topics edited by Takaoka and Manne. In this post, I want to mention a few problems that I noticed on my first quick read of Dembroff’s article. I hope that if […]

Ableism and the Epistemic Supremacy of Nondisabled Philosophers

Whether on the street or in the mall, the first lessons about disabled people that (nondisabled) parents and other (nondisabled) adults generally convey to children are in some respects prohibitive, usually imparted in hushed tones: don’t stare at that handicapped person; don’t look at her like that; it’s not polite to stare; just act like […]

The Trans/Gender Debates in Philosophy: A New Look for Old Views

In a recent post, I asserted that feminist philosophers must work harder to integrate analyses of ableism into their interventions in the ongoing debates in philosophy about gender and transgender (and in their feminist philosophical work more generally). I pointed out that heretofore interventions in the debates thus far have largely (I could have said […]