Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 4

In this fourth post of Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future—a series of posts designed to explain claims that I made in response to commentators in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability—I want to elaborate my claim that naturalization of disability in philosophy has expanded in new directions. My central […]

When I Was De-Platformed

For as long as I can remember, nondisabled philosophers (and disabled philosophers who seem to be grappling with the unfortunate effects of internalized ableism) have expressed some kind of hostility when I pointed out that their utterances use terms that have ableist connotations or are ableist in some other way. So, I wasn’t the least […]