More on Discrimination Against Disabled Students at Canadian Universities

The CBC News article that I have linked to below follows up on the LAW TIMES article that was the subject of yesterday’s post. Here is an excerpt from the CBC News article: Roch Longueépée says the University of Waterloo’s move to appeal a court order forcing it to accommodate him in the admissions process shows how far […]

Canadian Universities Discriminate Against Disabled Students Too

As you might have assumed, not only do Canadian universities discriminate against disabled faculty; they also discriminate against disabled students. A recent article in LAW TIMES explains the Sept. 20 Divisional Court decision, Longueépée v. University of Waterloo, 2019 ONSC 5465, that “showed the admission process created a discriminatory barrier for a student with a disability […]

Dorian, Disaster Relief, and Disabled People

In her excellent and provocative post the other day, Melinda drew attention to a number of the political, social, and economic implications of and issues that surround “natural” disasters, including the ways that these disasters tie into climate change and the warming of the planet. Melinda and her family have now evacuated. The last word […]

Adding BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY To Your Toolbox

As we continue to foster a readership/listenership across continents, I want to encourage readers and listeners who either come here regularly or have only recently found us to draw upon the resources that BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY offers. If you browse through our pages, posts, and archives, you will find essays, reprinted articles, CFPs, and other items […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 2

In my previous post in this series of posts, I explained that one of my aims in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability was to distinguish the argumentative claims of the book and its overall approach from other extant philosophy of disability. I wanted to do so in order to […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 1

In my reply to commentators on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability at the Pacific APA (previously posted on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY here), I wanted to accomplish a number of things. In addition to offering an exegesis of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability and responses to critical remarks about the book that the various commentators […]

App-Based Wayfinding for Blind Students, Staff, and Campus Visitors at University of Guelph

The article by Meaghan Haldenby reprinted below originally appeared in University Affairs on May 27, 2019. The original version of Haldenby’s article includes a video that provides a demonstration of the oral description and other features of the BlindSquare app that U of G uses. _________________________________________________________ The University of Guelph has installed BlindSquare, an app-based wayfinding […]

Taking Fat Students (and Staff) Into Account

Disabled students and staff are often (usually?) not taken into account in academic and other university and college initiatives designed to improve campus inclusion and diversity. Nor, usually, are fat students and staff taken into account in these initiatives for inclusion and diversity. If, like me, you understand disability as an apparatus of force relations, […]

Leaving Disabled People Out of Discussions of Universal Design

When I first glanced at the title of the most recent post at the APA Blog, “APA Talking Teaching: Accessibility and UDL,” I was pleased. I had assumed that the post would continue the work on Universal Design (UD) and learning that I and other disabled philosophers have produced on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, in the Dialogues […]