Landmark Settlement With Harvard University To Improve Online Accessibility

The National Association for the Deaf (NAD) in the U.S. has announced a landmark settlement with Harvard University which includes requirements that go beyond the university’s recently-introduced accessibility policies, including requirements to caption live events, third-party platforms (such as YouTube videos), and department-sponsored student groups. The following article about the settlement (dated November 27, 2019) […]

Weinberg and Barnes on Ableist Language

Last week, Justin Weinberg put two additional posts on Daily Nous that make liberal use of ableist language. Elizabeth Barnes gave him permission to do so. In a manner of speaking. For only days before Weinberg put these ableist posts on his blog, he published an interview with Barnes in which she speaks disparagingly about […]

Do Disabled Canadians Vote?

A federal election is taking place in Canada today. All across the country, eligible voters will submit their ballots to determine the next federal government here. The months and weeks leading up to the election have been rife with controversies and scandals, including the SNC-Lavalin affair, Bill 21 in Quebec, and shocking revelations and photographs […]

More on Discrimination Against Disabled Students at Canadian Universities

The CBC News article that I have linked to below follows up on the LAW TIMES article that was the subject of yesterday’s post. Here is an excerpt from the CBC News article: Roch Longueépée says the University of Waterloo’s move to appeal a court order forcing it to accommodate him in the admissions process shows how far […]

Canadian Universities Discriminate Against Disabled Students Too

As you might have assumed, not only do Canadian universities discriminate against disabled faculty; they also discriminate against disabled students. A recent article in LAW TIMES explains the Sept. 20 Divisional Court decision, Longueépée v. University of Waterloo, 2019 ONSC 5465, that “showed the admission process created a discriminatory barrier for a student with a disability […]

Dorian, Disaster Relief, and Disabled People

In her excellent and provocative post the other day, Melinda drew attention to a number of the political, social, and economic implications of and issues that surround “natural” disasters, including the ways that these disasters tie into climate change and the warming of the planet. Melinda and her family have now evacuated. The last word […]

Adding BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY To Your Toolbox

As we continue to foster a readership/listenership across continents, I want to encourage readers and listeners who either come here regularly or have only recently found us to draw upon the resources that BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY offers. If you browse through our pages, posts, and archives, you will find essays, reprinted articles, CFPs, and other items […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 2

In my previous post in this series of posts, I explained that one of my aims in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability was to distinguish the argumentative claims of the book and its overall approach from other extant philosophy of disability. I wanted to do so in order to […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 1

In my reply to commentators on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability at the Pacific APA (previously posted on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY here), I wanted to accomplish a number of things. In addition to offering an exegesis of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability and responses to critical remarks about the book that the various commentators […]