Feminist Reflections on MAiD and Compassion

The charge of fallacious slippery-slope reasoning that Jocelyn Downie, Udo Schüklenk, and other proponents of medically assisted suicide (MAiD) routinely direct at critics of the practice relies on an outdated juridical conception of power that has conditioned Western philosophy and on outmoded ideas about the self-originating character of the neoliberal subject’s freedom and autonomy that […]

Bioethics De-Mystified

In “Bioethics as a Technology of Government,” the fifth chapter of my monograph, Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, I assert that bioethics emerged as a technology of government to resolve the problem that the production of disability poses for the neoliberal management of societies. In particular, disability is constituted as a problem for a […]

Is Resistance to MAiD a Feminist Issue?

The refusal of feminist bioethicists, (so-called) disability bioethicists, and feminist philosophers in general to address the expansion of MAiD (medically assisted suicide) and eugenics in Canada, albeit predictable, is nonetheless egregious, unethical, and goes against everything feminists should aim to cultivate. Indeed, this refusal should make disabled philosophers (and other disabled people) question the professed […]

MAiD, (Canadian) Bioethicists, and the Banality of Evil

Two or three generations from now, philosophers will look back in horror and shame at the role that Canadian bioethicists and philosophers played in the normalization of medically assisted suicide (a.k.a. MAiD) in Canada. In the seventh-anniversary installment of Dialogues on Disability that I posted last month, Isaac Jiang, with whom I composed the installment, […]

Schliesser on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability: An Update

I’ve been busy the last few days preparing both a talk that I’m giving to the Philosophy Club at Stetson University later today and the seventh-anniversary installment of Dialogues on Disability that will be posted on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY this coming Wednesday. So, I haven’t had time to put together a response to Eric Schliesser’s commentary […]

Schliesser on Tremain on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

Over at Digressions & Impressions, Eric Schliesser has written a critical commentary on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability that might interest some of you. The post also draws attention to In the Shadow of Justice by Kat Forrester. The title of the post indicates that it is the first part of Schliesser’s discussion of […]