Schliesser on Tremain on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

Over at Digressions & Impressions, Eric Schliesser has written a critical commentary on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability that might interest some of you. The post also draws attention to In the Shadow of Justice by Kat Forrester. The title of the post indicates that it is the first part of Schliesser’s discussion of […]

Peter Singer and the Mystique of Bioethics, Part 2

As I indicated in Part 1, although feminist bioethicists and so-called disability bioethicists too insist that Peter Singer’s claims about disability are morally reprehensible, they maintain that the field of bioethics itself is a noble and progressive enterprise within which one can selectively adopt a neutral stance on certain bioethical issues (Scully 2021). Indeed, disability […]

Peter Singer and The Mystique of Bioethics, Part 1

In recent years, philosophers have increasingly engaged with each other in impassioned discussions about academic freedom in the discipline and profession of philosophy and across academia more broadly, as well as participated in heated debates with members of the broader public about freedom of speech in society more generally. The topics around which the most […]

Bioethics has Always Been Eugenic

A group of authors has just published a brief essay for the Monash Bioethics Review entitled “Can ‘eugenics’ be defended?” In the essay, the authors contend that bioethics discourse is polarized and politicized, and that this is a problem. While the goals of their essay seem to shift across the essay, the specific discussion they […]

(How) Is Disability Relevant to the Field of Social Ontology?

The conception of disability that currently prevails in philosophy construes it as a philosophically uninteresting and value-neutral biological trait, that is, as a self-evidently natural and deleterious characteristic, difference, or property that some people embody or possess. Insofar as philosophers hold this naturalized and individualized conception of disability, they assume that disability is a prediscursive […]

Letter to the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs of the Government of Canada in Opposition to Bill C-7

This morning, as per Catherine Frazee’s request, I submitted a letter to the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs of the Canadian Government. The letter articulates my opposition to Bill C-7, which would expand access to medically-assisted suicide (“MAID”) for disabled people. Given the dearth of disabled philosophers (of disability) in Canadian philosophy, […]

Bioethics, Catherine Frazee, and MAID in Canada

In a previous post, I discussed the role that bioethicists in Canada, including feminist bioethicists, have played in the development in Canada of legislation and public policy designed to facilitate medically-assisted suicide and subsequent expansion of it. This set of events should be recognized as the incremental normalization of power relations that I discuss in […]