Prestige Bias in Canadian Philosophy Hiring Practices (reprised)

It seems timely to re-run one of my favourite (because so apt and enduring) posts that I wrote several years ago for the Discrimination and Disadvantage blog (now unceremoniously deleted). The post highlights distinctions between how prestige bias manifests in American philosophy departments and how it is produced in Canadian philosophy departments and in other […]

Some of Our Favourite Posts of 2021

This post provides a retrospective of some of the most popular BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY posts from 2021. The Dialogues on Disability interviews for the year were also crowd favourites. You can find the archive of the Dialogues on Disability series interviews here. Each of the series interviews from the past year will be featured in the […]

Helen De Cruz and Prestige Bias (in Canadian Philosophy Departments)

I greatly admire Helen De Cruz who, in my view, exhibits a genuine commitment to diversity and inclusivity in philosophy, something that is rarer than most philosophers want to acknowledge. I especially appreciate the empirical and analytical work on prestige bias in philosophy that Helen has initiated and developed. In particular, I want to commend […]

Elitism and the Engines of Democracy

I have long thought that the impetus to “diversify” the student and faculty bodies of elite institutions such as Yale, Oxford, Princeton, Stanford, and Cambridge is not as it first appears nor are the consequences of this movement. That is, I have long thought that the (neoliberal) motivation to increase the demographic diversity of students […]

Disability and Inaccessibility at Yale

In March of 2017, I wrote a post at Discrimination and Disadvantage about the situation for disabled students at Yale and other elite universities, drawing upon an article in Yale News that documented recommendations made in the Yale Disability Resources Task Force Report. Almost two years later, the situation for disabled students (and staff) at Yale remains grim. […]