CFP: Outsiders Within: Reflections on Being a Low-Income and/or First-Generation Philosopher, Philadelphia, PA, Jan. 8-11, 2020 (deadline: Sept. 30, 2019)

The Graduate Student Council (GSC) of the APA is now accepting abstracts for a panel discussion on navigating academic philosophy as a first-generation and/or low-income graduate student at the Eastern Division. Many philosophers have highlighted the lack of diversity amongst professional philosophers, and there are several active initiatives aimed at encouraging greater diversity, a great […]

CFP: Philosophy Born of Struggle, Grand Rapids, MI, Nov. 1-2, 2019 (Extended deadline: Aug. 31, 2019)

The 25th Philosophy Born of Struggle conference will be held at Embassy Suites by Hilton in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Philosophy Born of Struggle asks for papers or roundtable/panel proposals on neglected philosophers whose works can be considered contributions to philosophies born of struggle. Keynote speaker: Juliet Hooker We welcome submissions inspired by the conference theme. […]

Ableism and the Epistemic Supremacy of Nondisabled Philosophers

Whether on the street or in the mall, the first lessons about disabled people that (nondisabled) parents and other (nondisabled) adults generally convey to children are in some respects prohibitive, usually imparted in hushed tones: don’t stare at that handicapped person; don’t look at her like that; it’s not polite to stare; just act like […]

Philosophy of Disability: Present and Future, No. 2

In my previous post in this series of posts, I explained that one of my aims in the Pacific APA symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability was to distinguish the argumentative claims of the book and its overall approach from other extant philosophy of disability. I wanted to do so in order to […]

Stanley, The Stone, and Epistemic Humility

Jason Stanley is a nice guy. He is also an extremely influential philosopher, both within the discipline and profession of philosophy and beyond. I only wish that Jason would use that influence and, yes, power, to be a better ally to disabled philosophers. In particular, I wish that Jason would use the influence that he […]

Excluded, By Design

I began my earlier review of Widdows’s Perfect Me by wondering which is preferable: a feminist text such as Widdows’s that seems to add disability to its analysis as an afterthought (and in doing so naturalizes and rebiologizes disability) or a feminist text such as Kate Manne’s Down Girl  that disregards the apparatus of disability […]

Abstract for My Keynote Address at the Disabling Normativities Conference, University of Witwatersrand, Oct. 1-3, 2019

Here is the abstract for my Keynote Address at the Disabling Normativities conference in Johannesburg in October: Philosophy is the most conservative and homogeneous discipline across the humanities and social sciences with respect to areas of inquiry and specialization. The homogeneity of the topics and questions studied in philosophy is, furthermore, co-constitutive with the homogeneity […]

Perfect You

[On January 2 of this year, the day after BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY was launched, I posted a review of Widdows’s Perfect Me. Since this review of Widdows’s book is having a revival of sorts on Twitter and, furthermore, since many new readers/listeners might have missed the review when I initially posted it at the New Year, […]