Writing Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

  I enjoyed reading Sarah Tyson’s recent guest post about why she wrote her new book, Where Are the Women? Why Expanding the Archive Makes Philosophy Better. Since, in preparation for the Pacific APA, I have been thinking about my reasons for writing Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, and, furthermore, because I think that […]

CFP: Disability, Imperialism, and War, National Women’s Studies Association Disability Interest Group, San Francisco, Nov. 14-17, 2019 (deadline: Feb. 13, 2019)

This panel aims to bring transnational feminist disability studies perspectives to bear on contemporary conversations around U.S. imperialism and war, such as indigeneity, environmental violence, de/colonialism, disability in the global South, and state-sanctioned violence, to name a few. As scholars such as Jasbir Puar, Nirmala Erevelles, and Eunjung Kim have brought to the fore of […]

Using Phineas Gage for Questions on Personal Identity and Other Topics in Philosophy of Mind, Experimental Philosophy, Cognitive Science, etc.

Philosophers generally take disabilities (plural) and impairments to be self-evident, natural, and politically neutral human characteristics or attributes that certain people possess and embody.  In recent years, however, a growing number of philosophers have challenged this view, consolidating an area of philosophy for which I coined the name “philosophy of disability.” Many philosophers of disability, […]

Microaggressions and Implicit Bias

In two previous posts (here and here), I consider the tactics of force relations that have come to be referred to as “microaggressions”. In the first post, I discuss ableist language and ableist exceptionism as examples of microaggressions. In the second post, I discuss microaggressions as “intentional and nonsubjective” practices (tactics). I point out in […]

Perfect You

I still can’t decide which is better: a book of feminist philosophy, such as Kate Manne’s Down Girl (2018), that disregards disability almost entirely, or a book of feminist philosophy, such as Heather Widdows’s Perfect Me (2018), that seems to add disability to its analysis as an afterthought and does so in a way that […]

APA Symposium on Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability

The draft program for the upcoming Pacific APA meeting in Vancouver (April 17th-20th, 2019) went online in late November. The symposium on my book, Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, is scheduled for Thursday, April 18th, 1-4 p.m. My co-blogger, Melinda Hall, will chair the session. The other participants in the session are: Devonya Havis, […]