The Routledge Handbook of Feminist Philosophy of Science – 20% Off!

The new Routledge Handbook of Feminist Philosophy of Science, edited by Sharon Crasnow and Kristen Intemann, was published earlier this month. The collection comprises chapters by leading thinkers across a range of areas of feminist philosophy and other subfields. I am both honoured and humbled to be amongst them. Like most handbooks and readers, this […]

Opposition to Bill C-7 and Too Many Letters of Reference

No, this post isn’t taking on the important work done on The Philosophers’ Cocoon blog by advising philosophy job applicants about the appropriate contents of their dossier. Rather this post draws upon past interventions that I’ve made on BIOPOLITICAL PHILOSOPHY and on the earlier Discrimination and Disadvantage blog (here, here, and here) to reiterate that […]

List of Speakers for Philosophy, Disability, and Social Change

Philosophy, Disability, and Social Change, the online conference that I mentioned last week, is four months away; yet, already, anticipation and excitement about the event have started to build. Indeed, I predict that Philosophy, Disability, and Social Change will be the philosophy conference of the year. Philosophy, Disability, and Social Change, which Jonathan Wolff and […]

Philosophy, Disability, and Social Change (December 2020)

Jonathan Wolff (Oxford) and I will be running an online conference in December, over three consecutive weekday afternoons (U.K. time), on the theme of “Philosophy, Disability, and Social Change.” The full conference program, which will comprise the hottest names in philosophy of disability and provide details about dates and times, will be posted on BIOPOLITICAL […]

Notes on Khader’s Decolonizing Universalism and the Problematization of Disability in Feminist Philosophy

In Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability, I aimed to denaturalize disability by arguing that disability is an apparatus of power rather than a natural human difference, personal attribute, or biological characteristic. My argument is thus distinct from the approaches to disability that disabled philosophers of disability such as Barnes, Silvers, and Stramondo take and […]